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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 244-247

Assessment of noise levels in clinical and laboratory areas of dental teaching institution, Ahmedabad


1 Department of Public Health Dentistry, Siddhpur Dental College and Hospital, Gujarat, India
2 Department of Public Health Dentistry, Ahmedabad Dental College and Hospital, Gujarat, India
3 Department of Public Health Dentistry, Government Dental College and Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India

Correspondence Address:
Sujal M Parkar
B-25 Krishna Bunglows I, Gandhinagar Highway, Motera, Ahmedabad-380 005, Gujarat
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2278-344X.143064

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Aim: To measure and assess the noise levels produced by different dental equipments. Materials and Methods: Measurement of the noise level was performed in preclinics, clinics, and dental laboratory of different departments of Ahmedabad Dental College and Hospital. The noise levels were determined using a Mini sound meter (CEM USA), which was placed at the dentist's and laboratory technician's ear level and at a distance of 1 m from a main noise source. The level of noise was measured in decibel (dB) while the instruments were at maximum running speed. Results: In dental laboratory, the nosiest dental equipment was gypsum lathe trimmer with the noise level ranging from 87.36 to 98.3 dB. In preclinical area, the sound produced by low-speed air-rotor ranges from 66.68 to 69.28 dB. In clinical areas, the highest noise produced was by high-speed air-rotor (73.36 to 81.8 dB). The noise created by suction pump when in contact with mucosa was in range from 73.1 to 80.32 dB. The noise levels generated during cutting were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of noncutting, which was proved in the course of the measurements. Conclusion: At the end of the study it can be concluded that the sound levels are below that causes damage to the human ear (85 dB). However, dental technicians and other personnel working all day in noisy laboratories could be at risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss if they did not choose not to wear ear protection.


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